“Home 2.0” Hits the Road!

Our latest school tour is up and running! After two years of community interviews and storytelling, Home 2.0 hit the road this week to start its Manitoban tour. We’ll be taking the show to high schools in Winnipeg and surrounding areas to share stories of immigration, resettlement, and what it means to start over in a new country.

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“Do you remember your first time on a plane?”

This past week, we opened the show with a public preview at the Graffiti Gallery. The cast got to test-run the show with an audience, getting folks on their feet to help work through the issues presented by the play. One audience member said that the stories felt so familiar. As someone who works with newcomers, she was moved by the common threads between her clients and the characters in the play.

Because Home 2.0 is presented “forum theatre style”, the play shows audiences the worst case scenario for the characters and invites them to explore actions that will lead to a better ending. After the play, audience members were encouraged to swap out with the characters to find a solution together. Audience members stepped into the scenes, offering one student the chance to succeed in sports while another was given help with sponsorship papers. One audience member even stepped into a bully’s shoes to make a newcomer student feel welcome! Home 2.0 is already showing audiences how we can help make a change for the better.

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“Home 2.0” Preview at the Graffiti Gallery

We kicked off the tour on Monday with back-to-back double-show days at Steinbach Regional Secondary School before performing for Seven Oaks Met School and Miles Mac Collegiate.  “The students at our first show were amazing,” shares Director Hope McIntyre, “they stopped the action and jumped in with amazing enthusiasm. In fact, they were competing to get up there.” Want to bring the show to your school? We only have a few dates left before the tour wraps up on December 7 – contact Angelina at touring@sarasvati.ca for more information!

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The cast and stage manager of “Home 2.0”!

Not a student or a teacher? No problem! You still have one more chance to check out Home 2.0 outside of a school – we’ll be at the Millennium Library on Saturday, October 20th at 2PM. While we recommend the show for youth thirteen and up, all ages are welcome! Admission is by donation. For more info, visit our event page!

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Meet the Cast of “Home 2.0”!

“This project means a lot to me, especially as a first generation Canadian that grew up watching my parents going through similar struggles after their immigration.”

– performer Joanne Roberts

Over the past two years, we’ve conducted interviews with local community groups to share the stories of newcomer youth. Home 2.0 was created as part of our “New Beginnings” project, focusing on youth experiences of immigration and resettlement.

After a great preview at FemFest 2018, Home 2.0 is ready to hit the road starting October 15th! Meet the incredible cast bringing newcomer stories to life:

Melissa Langdon

Melissa Langdon

Melissa Langdon is thrilled to be back with Sarasvàti Productions. A recent graduate of the University of Winnipeg’s Theatre and Film program, she loves singing, dancing, and playing the violin. You might have seen her in past productions as Kay in Time and the Conways, Nearly Wild in Concord Floral, or Rosencrantz in Rosencrantz Guildenstern Are Dead and the Original New Beginnings cast.

 

Reena Jolly

Reena Jolly

Reena Jolly is keeping herself very busy this year when it comes to theatre. Later in the year, Reena will be doing another touring show with MTYP called Torn Through Time. When Reena is not out saving the world one smile at a time, she enjoys things like hanging out with her family, singing in the shower and being a decent human being. Reena feels very blessed to be surrounded by such talented and inspiring performers all year round.

 

 

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Manuel Ortega

Manuel Ortega is proud to collaborate with Sarasvàti Productions. Arriving as refugees with his family in the winter of 1990, this play strikes a certain chord in his heart. Manuel is a graduate of U of M and has worked under the directions of Bill Kerr, Chris Johnson, Gary Jarvis and Kelly Jenken. Fluent in English and Spanish, Manuel enjoys Wrestling, Jiu-Jitsu, singing, and dancing, in no particular order.

 

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Matthew Paris-Irvine

Matthew Paris-Irvine is thrilled to be making his second appearance with Sarasvàti Productions! Last appearing in the Giving Voice tour, Matt is ecstatic to be touring again with such a powerful story.  A recent graduate of the Honours Acting program at the University of Winnipeg, selected past credits include: Time and The Conways, Concord Floral, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (University of Winnipeg); Tuesdays and Sundays (Beau Theatre Co); and The Laramie Project (Meraki Productions). He would like to thank those who have shared their stories and hopes this show can serve as a catalyst for even more voices to be emboldened.

 

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Joanne Roberts

Joanne Roberts approaches acting like one does an extreme sport. A veteran of horror films, she most recently starred in a short film titled “Dead Bolt” produced by CBC. As a comédienne Joanne joined Théâtre Cercle Molière for their Manitoba tour of De Bouche à oreille. Not one to shy from away from drama, a notable performance was as Sawda in Wajdi Mouawad’s  Scorched. The Quill Newspaper stated that her performance “hit everyone in the theatre with intense emotion [.]” Joanne is proud of her work, but also of her studio where she coaches new artists. Many students have gone onto professional careers.

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Denisse Samaniego

 

Denisse Samaniego is a Theatre and Education student at University of Winnipeg. As a part of the original cast of New Beginnings, she is excited to work with Sarasvàti Productions once again to bring you the revised version, Home 2.0. As an immigrant herself coming to Winnipeg at the age of 3, she finds the stories very close to her heart and is so honoured to be sharing these stories to all audiences.

 

 

 

Headshot Bennette Villones

Bennette Villones

Bennette Villones is just a girl who wants to inspire people and wants to pursue her dreams in the arts. To make and create art that’ll have an impact on people. A way to make people smile, laugh, feel understood, that they’re not alone and that they have a voice of their own they can share to world.

 

 

 

Home 2.0 has two public previews for audiences that may not be able to experience this show in a school. The first preview is the Graffiti Gallery (109 Higgins Ave) on October 11th at 7PM (admission by donation). The second is on October 20th 2018 at the Millennium Library at 7PM as part of the library’s teen program and requires registration on the library’s website. . For more information on the tour and previews, please contact Angelina at touring@sarasvati.ca or call the office at (204) 586-2236.

 

“Home 2.0” Comes to Schools This Fall!

“Can you name a time that you’ve had to start all over? New school? New house? New activity? Throughout the course of the show, we’ll be like flies on the wall watching the stories of people who had to start over. What you are about to see is from true stories shared by people about coming to Canada.” – Joker, Home 2.0

Imagine sitting in your school gym and getting to experience music, dance, and visuals from half a dozen different cultural groups played out before your eyes, all threaded together to tell the journey of displaced people arriving to Canada. At the end of the performance, the actors invite you on stage to step in to the shoes of a character and explore solutions to the challenges they faced.

In May, we saw the culmination of the first part of our newcomer community collaboration project, New Beginnings. Now we’re continuing the project with Home 2.0!

Home 2.0 was created especially for youth, focusing on their experiences of resettlement. Young audiences will engage with characters their own age, allowing youth to see themselves and their stories represented onstage. By sharing stories of immigrant and refugee youth who have resettled in Canada, Home 2.0 will foster important dialogue around the challenges of newcomers. For many youth, this might be the first time they see their experiences represented in the arts. For others, it might be the first time they’ve been able to really grasp what it’s like to be forced to leave your home and start again halfway across the world.

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Like our previous school tours, Home 2.0 is performed “forum theatre style”, meaning the audience gets a say in the events onstage. Forum Theatre is a lively and effective way to look at and counter issues that our community faces today by encouraging audiences to take an active role in the show rather than acting as bystanders. The show offers students the chance to watch the “worst case scenario” play out before them – followed by the opportunity to change the ending, offer solutions, or provide support for the characters. By challenging what happens, youth are able to think about how they would act or how they wish they had acted in a similar scenario. Ultimately, the show promotes empathy and compassion, educating students on the experiences of starting over in a new country.

We’ll be touring the show throughout Winnipeg and Manitoba October 15 through to December 7, visiting schools in the community to promote inclusion and understanding. If you’re a teacher looking to bring the show to your students, contact Daphne at associate@sarasvati.ca for more information!

Hands Up for the Cast & Crew of Shattered!

6,161 is the number of people who saw Shattered this tour. Incredible!

After performing the show a total of 60 times 47 different locations, including 39 high schools in Winnipeg and surrounding areas, what are the moments that stood out to this formidable cast and crew the most?

“My biggest highlight is watching the students who are brave enough to come up and share their own personal stories”, said Erin Cunningham, who was at every performance as Stage Manager. “It’s nice to see not only them feeling brave enough to share their stories, but that the students in the audience are understanding enough to listen and they don’t get judgemental about it.” Erin also put an incredible amount of work into coordinating this year’s tour– a gargantuan task that calls for a standing ovation in itself.

“There have been a few girls that have come up to me after and talked to me about how they have already been to a treatment centre just like I had gone to for my eating disorder” said Kelsey Funk, who has shared her lived experience with the project. Kelsey plays Amanda, a high school student who struggles with an eating disorder unbeknownst to her family and friends. “They tell me that it has been a powerful experience to watch the show and you can kind of see hope in their eyes, so that’s been really great for me.”

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Performance at Children of the Earth High School

The cast and crew of Shattered set out to make an impact on schools; to engage students in open discussion of mental health, to reach out to those who have experience with mental health issues, and to encourage human understanding among those who have not. The whole team is extremely proud to have made a positive impact on so many young people.

“I enjoyed it because it felt real and it hits you hard”, said a student at Garden City Collegiate.
“I realised that a lot more people in our school had experience with mental illness than I thought”, said a student at Fort Richmond Collegiate.
“I just wanted to say thank you all so much for coming to my school…the message was so powerful and I relate so much to these stories” said a student at John Taylor Collegiate.

Although our cast and crew deserve a much needed break, it’s clear that they will miss spending so much time with each other. “One of my favourite times is when we’re in the passenger van driving to our different locations”, said Reena Jolly who plays Stacy. “You get to bond and just talk to each other on the drive to wherever we’re going. I love that part.”

20161129_093559Touring a performance like this has a profound impact on the performers too. “After the show at Churchill high a student came up to me and she was very, very emotional”, said Erica Wilson, who plays KoKo, a young, two-spirited character in Shattered.  “Her friend is going through a transition where she’s not comfortable with her gender. I was able to explain to her that a lot of girls and a lot of boys feel that way…so it’s a very emotional tour.”

 

We have felt honoured to share these stories with the next generation of Manitobans. We hope that the empathy and understanding they are full of today stays with them as they become adults. Their bravery and acceptance of mental health gives us much hope for the future.

Making Noise for Mental Health at the Millennium Library

The awesome cast & crew of Shattered have been busy touring all over Manitoba, and now they’re excited to be performing in the heart of their home city at the Millennium Library!

shattered-rehearsal-oct5_2016-092Shattered has been making an impact and by the end of the run will have done 59 performances! Here’s what some of the teachers have had to say.

The show was great! I’ve had a chance to speak with about 75% of the students who saw it and it has generated some very honest discussion–exactly what we were hoping for” – John Kerr, Balmoral Hall

“I discussed the play with both my theatre classes and the overall consensus was that it was fantastic. I even had a colleague stop me in the hall to tell me how moved she was by the performance and the interaction with the kids. This was, bar none, the absolute most engaging piece I have witnessed at our school. Our students really became involved with the piece and I think it resonated powerfully with them all, particularly the message that they are not alone.” – Kim Dudek, Murdock MacKay

“The power of forum is nothing short of amazing.  The way it allows for tough topics to be talked about and considered in such depth, it makes me wonder why this type of theatre isn’t being done more often by more companies (or in more schools for that matter!).  The fact that Sarasvati has mandated to produce a forum piece on a two year cycle that hinges on a topic pressing in the broader community is something that needs to continue to happen.”- Brett Schmall, Green Valley School

One of the best parts of performing Shattered is engaging with the students during the ‘interventions.’ The interventions are moments when the students clap to stop the action of the play because the want the characters to make a different choice.

One student, who was initially so nervous she wanted someone else to speak for her wound up taking control and leading the scene herself! She wanted to go over to KoKo to comfort and offer help. She  said that we all have problems and KoKo is dealing with hers in her own way. It was a great moment to experience.

On November 26th Sarasvàti Productions will welcome local youth organizations to a free performance in the Carol Shields Auditorium thanks to a partnership with the Millennium Library. While the performance is mainly for youth organizations, we will be offering a few seats to the public. If you’d like to attend, please RSVP at 204-586-2236 or by emailing associate@sarasvati.ca.

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Shattered Hits the Road!

img_20161012_140356“I wish they had this when I was in high school,” was a repeated response from audiences when Shattered previewed to a large crowd last Thursday evening at Graffiti Gallery. In preparation for the launch of Shattered into Manitoba schools and education centres the play was premiered to interested organizations and the public as a fundraiser for the tour. The response was overwhelming. Those in attendance responded adamantly that we should be taking Shattered to parents and to an even younger age group. We also received offers to advocate at schools who have not booked yet!

Shattered was great. It was fun but still got across a very important message”, said Griffin Jenkins, Youth Programs Coordinator at Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba (MDAM). “I personally related to some of the scenes almost as if it were my own life so it is amazing to see those parts of someone’s life shown to a large audience to understand how painful it really is.”

Griffin spoke to the audience before the play began alongside Bonnie Bricker, mental health advocate and Director of the Family Navigation Program at MDAM. “I thought your script and the actors were sincere”, said Bonnie, “[they] did not overact, and provided effective characterizations. I wish you every success in utilizing this creative tool to reach our most vulnerable population.”

This performance was the first opportunity for all-youth cast of Shattered to incorporate audience participation. Shattered is a forum theatre play, which means scenes are intentionally rife with conflict. The idea is that audience members will watch characters make choices, see the effects of those choices, and think about alternative choices that may lead to a more positive outcome.
“The use of forum theatre was done brilliantly”, said Griffin, “it gave the audience who may have never been in that situation [the chance to] speak about what they think should have been done. More importantly it gives people who have been in that situation the opportunity to share how they wished that scenario occurred”

Shattered hits the road today with their first school performance at Balmoral Hall. The Sarasvàti team has been hard at work on Shattered for the past six months and we can’t wait to work with these youth.

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“Thank you Sarasvati for the great work you do in the community …this play is very powerful & I am sure will be well received in the schools & make a difference in the lives of youth. it was inspiring to see such great interaction between actors & audience…everyone was so engaged. Left with a feeling of hope.” – Kay Stewart, Social Worker

Check out these articles to read more about Shattered! There are only a few dates left for schools to book!!
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/entertainment/arts/theatre-with-a-social-conscience-391420421.html

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/our-communities/New-play-explores-youth-mental-health-396343861.html

 

Shattered Launches Tonight!

Although it is targeted at youth, Shattered is a powerful production and a must see for everyone! At our recent open rehearsal, one viewer asked “where were you when I was in high school?”

The interactive style is what truly makes it unique and empowering. As the audience’s guide for the experience, GeNie Baffoe has a presence that even the toughest audiences—aka grade 7 to grade 12—will warm to. Confident, expressive, and welcoming, GeNie is the Joker (a term used for a facilitator in Forum Theatre). He will have lots of back-up with the talented group of young  actors in the cast. They hit the road next week to open up the discussion about mental health with students at dozens of Manitoba schools.

“If you disagree with what is happening in the scene, if you notice that a character could be making better choices I want you to clap and yell stop at which point you will rise from your seat, join us up on stage and take the place of one of these characters, are you ready?”, announces GeNie. The actors step into place and begin the scene. In this scene, a young man berates another young man at school after finding out that his mother has a mental illness. Many characters are bystanders, but nobody steps in.

*Clap!*

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The scene freezes. GeNie identifies the clapper and invites her up on stage. GeNie asks, “What do you think this character could have done instead?”
And just like that youth are up on their feet, engaging in proactive solutions to stopping the stigma and providing support for those dealing with mental health. It’s a beautiful sight to behold.

Sarasvàti Productions set the course for this play for youth while working on their larger Mental Health Project. The project saw Sarasvàti’s team of artists facilitate workshops with the public and a number of community organizations in order to gather real Winnipegger’s experiences with mental health. At the urging of youth a piece targeted to high schools was created. Shattered is set in a high school and is performed entirely by a young cast.

Since we can’t bring our fans and supporters in to high schools we have partnered with Graffiti Gallery and Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba to offer a special public preview. Funds raised will help take Shattered to schools that would not otherwise be able to afford it. Join us tonight, October 6th, at Graffiti Gallery (109 Higgins Avenue). The show starts at 7pm and tickets are only $10, available at the door. The performance is open to everyone. This is your chance to watch the play and hear what youth in our city are dealing with in terms of mental health.

We hope you can join us for the Shattered Fundraiser preview. If you’d like to support but you’re unable to attend you can contact the office at 204-586-2236 or donate at our website sarasvati.ca.  If you know of a school that should host a performance please contact Erin at touring@sarasvati.ca.